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A FAMILY BIBLIOGRAPHY


The following bibliography focuses on fiction and nonfiction picture books from our Phillips Brooks Library collection that provide lessons and launching points about discussions of family. The library also has chapter books that deal with these subjects, although they are not all included here. Annotations are from Library of Congress catalogs.

Family relationships | Single-parenting and divorce | Adoption | Same-sex families | Bi-racial families and skin differences | Identity

Family Relationships

Adoff- Black is Brown is Tan: Describes in verse a family with a brown-skinned mother, white-skinned father, two children, and their various relatives.

Anholt- Catherine and Laurence Anholt’s Big Book of Families: Poems, letters and illustrations celebrate the entire family, including grandmothers, fathers, sisters and brothers.

Bailey- Families: Describes different types of families around the world, discusses how families work and play together, and defines such terms as foster parent, household, and relative.

Blume- Super-Completely and Totally the Messiest: Olivia, who is very neat and practically perfect, despairs because her sister Sophia is super-completely and totally the messiest person, no matter where she goes or what she does.

Blume- The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo: Freddy hates being the middle one in the family until he gets a part in the school play.

Cole- Coming Together: Celebrations for African American Families: a collection of traditions used to observe occasions both large and intimate--Naming ceremonies, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and family reunions.

Cutler- Darcy and Gran Don’t Like Babies: Darcy and Gran are not happy about the idea of a new baby coming, but they change their minds after the birth.

Downey- Love is a Family: A little girl is embarassed that her mother will come to her school for Family Fun Night, because she is convinced they aren’t a real family. Once there, she finds that every family is different, and it is love that makes a family.

Erlbach- The Families Book: Includes activities to do with family, making family trees, keeping family traditions, solving family problems, and staying close to faraway relatives. Discusses what strengthens and weakens family life and how relatives interact.

Fisher- My Big Sister: Photographs and simple text illustrate baby's view of what it is like to have a big sister.

Garden- Molly’s Family: While preparing decorations for Open School Night, Molly and several of her classmates draw pictures of their families and discover that family means something different to each of them.

Gillespie- Love makes a family: portraits of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender parents and their families: This collection of informal family portraits and interviews with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) parents and their children grew out of a photo exhibit created by photographer Kaeser.           

Gillespie- Of Many Colors: Portraits of Multiracial Families: In this compendium from the Family Diversity Project, using photographs and interviews with both parents and children, the authors show us the joys and frustrations inherent in being multiracial in a country that officially recognizes only five racial categories.

Gordon- All Families are Different: Discusses differences in families in today's society, and what makes each family special.

Harris- Mail Harry to the Moon: Harry's older brother, unhappy that the new baby seems to have taken over, dreams up imaginative ways to get rid of him.

Hausherr- Celebrating Families: Presents brief descriptions of many different kinds of families, both traditional and non-traditional.

Hoffman- The Barefoot Book of Brother and Sister Tales: A collection of stories from around the world, which explore the unique relationship between siblings.

Jenness- Families: a Celebration of Diversity, Commitment, and Love: Photographs and text depict the lives of seventeen families from around the country, some with step relationships, divorce, gay parents, foster siblings, and other diverse components.

Johnson- One of Three: A series of candid reflections by the youngest of three sisters on her daily relationships with her older sisters and family.

Kuklin- Families: Children from diverse families share thoughts about their families and photographs.

Kuklin- How My Family Lives in America: African-American, Asian-American, and Hispanic-American children describe their families' cultural traditions.

Look- Henry's First-Moon Birthday: A young girl helps her grandmother with preparations for the traditional Chinese celebration to welcome her new baby brother.

Menzel- Hungry Planet: What the World Eats: A photographic collection exploring what the world eats featuring portraits of thirty families from twenty-four countries surrounded by a week's worth of food.

Morris- Families: A simple explanation of families, how they function, how they are different, and how they are alike.

Morris- Loving: Provides examples of the different ways in which love can be expressed, with an emphasis on the relationship between parent and child.

Muller- Giant Jack: a rat growing up in a mouse family, suffers from being larger and clumsier than his siblings, until Mother Mouse explains that his differences make him special.

Ormerod- Who’s Whose?: Three very busy families engage in such activities as school, soccer, piano playing, and cooking. Readers seek to untangle who belongs in which house.

Parr- The Family Book: Represents a variety of families, some big and some small, some with only one parent and some with two moms or dads, some quiet and some noisy, but all alike in some ways and special no matter what.

Pellegrini- Families are Different: An adopted Korean girl discovers that her classmates have different types of families.

Pham- Big Sister, Little Sister: A little sister describes what it is like to have a big sister.

Polacco- My Rotten Redheaded, Older Brother: After losing running, climbing, throwing, and burping competitions to his obnoxious older brother, a young boy makes a wish on a falling star.

Reynolds- Ish: Ramon loses confidence in his ability to draw, but his sister gives him a new perspective on things.

Rylant- The Relatives Came: The relatives come to visit from Virginia and everyone has a wonderful time.

Simon- All Families Are Special: Students in Mrs. Mack's class describe their families--big or small, living together or apart, with two moms or none--and learn why every family is special and important.

Super- Family traditions: Discusses traditions and the ways in which they are significant, with an emphasis on family traditions.

Tax- Families: Six-year-old Angie explores the dizzying number of possible relationships created by marriages, divorces, adoptions and single parenting.

Tusa- Sisters: Two sisters have an argument about how to cook an artichoke, but they cannot stay mad at each other for long--especially when the artichoke keeps turning up in the most surprising places.

Willner-Pardo:  What I’ll Remember When I Am a Grown-up: During a weekend stay with his father and stepmother, a young boy comes to terms with living with two separate but loving families.

Winthrop-Squashed in the Middle: When Daisy, a middle child, is invited to spend the night at her friend's house, her family finally pays attention to her.

 

Books for Single-Parent Families and Discussions Around Divorce

Baum- One More Time: Simon and his father spend a pleasant afternoon in the park before Simon goes home to his mother.

Brown- Dinosaurs Divorce: Dinosaur characters introduce aspects of divorce such as its causes and effects, living with a single parent and adjusting to a stepparent.

Bunting- My Mom’s Wedding: Seven-year-old Pinkie has mixed feelings about her divorced mother's wedding especially when she learns that her beloved father will be an attending guest.

Clifton- Everett Anderson’s Goodbye: Everett Anderson has a difficult time coming to terms with his grief after his father dies.

Coffett- Fred Stays with Me: A child describes how she lives sometimes with his mother and sometimes with his father, but his dog is his constant companion.

Coy- Two Old Potatoes and Me: After a young girl finds two old potatoes at her father's house, they plant and tend them to see if they will have new potatoes in September.

DiCamillo- Because of Winn-Dixie: Ten-year-old India Opal Buloni describes her first summer in the town of Naomi, Florida, and all the good things that happen to her because of her big ugly dog Winn-Dixie.

Downey- Love is a Family: A little girl is embarassed that her mother will come to her school for Family Fun Night, because she is convinced they don’t aren’t a real family. Once there, she finds that every family is different, and it is love that makes a family.

Erlbach- The Families Book: true stories about real kids and the people they live with and love.
             
Garden- Molly’s Family: While preparing decorations for Open School Night, Molly and several of her classmates draw pictures of their families and discover that family means something different to each of them.

Hamilton- Sweet Whispers, Brother Rush: Fourteen-year-old Tree, resentful of her family, sees the ghost of her dead uncle and comes to a deeper understanding of her family's problems.

Holt- Mister and Me: In a small Louisiana mill town in 1940, Jolene does not want her Momma to marry the logger who is courting her, but it seems that even her most defiantly bad behavior cannot make him go away.

Holyoke- Help! A Girl’s Guide to Divorce and Stepfamilies: Answers letters from girls dealing with various aspects of divorce, remarriage, and stepfamilies. Includes tips, quizzes, and advice.

Kuklin- How My Family Lives in America: African-American, Asian-American, and Hispanic-American children describe their families' cultural traditions.

Lansky- It’s Not Your Fault, Koko Bear: Koko Bear learns what divorce means, how to deal with changes, how to recognize and talk about her feelings, and that the divorce is not her fault. Each page includes tips for parents.

Levy- Totally Uncool: As she describes all the things that are "uncool" about her father's latest girlfriend, a young girl begins to admit that there are some things she likes about her.

Lindsay- Do I Have a Daddy?: A single mother explains to her son that his daddy left soon after he was born. Includes a section with suggestions for answering the question, "Do I have a daddy?"

Masurel- Two Homes: A young boy named Alex enjoys the homes of both of his parents who live apart but love Alex very much.

McAfee- The Visitors Who Came to Stay: When Mary and her son come to stay with Katy and her divorced father, Katy has a hard time learning to share her father's love.

Powell- Family Break-up: Explains the emotional and practical problems that arise when family members separate because the parents are breaking up, discussing what happens to the children, how life will change, and how it will be the same.

Rylant- The Van Gogh Café: The Van Gogh Cafe, located in Flowers, Kansas, has magic in its walls, causing strange and mysterious events to occur there.

Stern- Divorce is Not the End of the World: Two children talk about the changes that occur with divorce and how to cope with these changes.

Thomas- My Family’s Changing: This book, written by a psychotherapist, introduces the idea and process of a divorce, as well as discussing how it often affects the members of the family.

Willner-Pardo- What I’ll Remember When I Am a Grown-up: During a weekend stay with his father and stepmother, a young boy comes to terms with living with two separate but loving families.

Books for Discussions Around Adoption

Bunting- Jin Woo: Davey is dubious about having a new adopted brother from Korea, but when he finds out that his parents still love him, he decides that having a baby brother will be fine.

Curtis- Tell me again about the night I was born: A young girl asks her parents to tell her again the cherished family story about her birth and adoption.

D’Antonio- Our Baby from China: An American couple goes to China to adopt a baby.

Katz- Over the Moon: A loving couple dream of a baby born far away and know that this is the baby they have been waiting to adopt.

Keller- Horace: Horace, an adopted child, realizes that being part of a family depends on how you feel and not how you look.

Little- Emma’s Yucky Brother: Emma finds out how hard it is to be a big sister when her family adopts a four-year-old boy named Max.

Pellegrini- Families are Different: An adopted Korean girl discovers that her classmates have different types of families.

Rosenberg- We Wanted You: Parents tell how they waited and prepared for the child that they wanted so much.

Say- Allison: When Allison realizes that she looks more like her favorite doll than like her parents, she comes to terms with this unwelcomed discovery through the help of a stray cat.

Books for Same-Sex Parents and Families

Bryan- The Different Dragon: This bedtime story about bedtime stories shows how the care and curiosity of a little boy, with some help from his willing moms, can lead to magical and unexpected places.

Cole- Princess Smartypants: Not wishing to marry any of her royal suitors, Princess Smartypants devises difficult tasks at which they all fail, until the multitalented Prince Swashbuckle appears.

Coombs- ABC, A Family Alphabet Book: It's family fun from A to Z in this alphabet book that shows kids and their parents laughing, playing and enjoying family life. All of the brilliant watercolors depict families headed by gay parents.

Garden- Molly’s Family: While preparing decorations for Open School Night, Molly and several of her classmates draw pictures of their families and discover that family means something different to each of them.

Greenberg- Zack's Story: Growing Up with Same-Sex Parents : An eleven-year-old boy describes life as part of a family made up of himself, his mother and her lesbian partner.

Haan- King & King: When the queen insists that the prince get married and take over as king, the search for a suitable mate does not turn out as expected.

Haan- King & King and Family: King and King go off of a trip and come back with an unexpected something, or someone, in a suitcase.

Kaeser- Love Makes a Family: Portraits of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Parents and Their Families: photographs by Gigi Kaeser; edited by Peggy Gillespie.

Parnell- And Tango Makes Three: At New York City's Central Park Zoo, two male penguins fall in love and start a family by taking turns sitting on an abandoned egg until it hatches.

Parr- The Family Book: Represents a variety of families, some big and some small, some with only one parent and some with two moms or dads, some quiet and some noisy, but all alike in some ways and special no matter what.

Polacco- In Our Mothers’ House: Three young children experience the joys and challenges of being raised by two mothers.

Setterington- Mom and Mum Are Getting Married: Rosie's Mom is getting married and Rosie is excited about all of the plans. At this party family and friends come together for a celebration of love in a changing world.

Valentine- The Duke Who Outlawed Jelly Beans: and Other Stories: A collection of five fairy tales about children with gay parents.

Books of Bi-racial Families and Discussions Around Skin Differences

Ada- I love Saturdays y Domingos: A young girl enjoys the similarities and the differences between her English-speaking and Spanish-speaking grandparents.

Adoff- Black is Brown is Tan: Describes in verse a family with a brown-skinned mother, white-skinned father, two children, and their various relatives.

Davol- Black, White, Just Right: A girl explains how her parents are different in color, tastes in art and food, and pet preferences, and how she herself is different too but just right.

Fox- Whoever You Are: A one-world, “we-are-all-the-same-under-the-skin'' message for the very young.

Gillespie- Of Many Colors: Portraits of Multiracial Families: This compendium from the Family Diversity Project, using photographs and interviews with both parents and children, shows us the joys and frustrations inherent in being multiracial in a country that officially recognizes only five racial categories.

Hamanaka- All the Colors of the Earth: Reveals in verse that despite outward differences children everywhere are essentially the same and all are lovable.

Hooks- Skin Again: Celebrating all that makes us unique, new ways to talk about race and identity are presented.

Igus- The Two Mrs. Gibsons: The biracial daughter of an African American father and a Japanese mother fondly recalls growing up with her mother and her father's mother, two very different but equally loving women.

Katz- The Colors of Us: Seven-year-old Lena and her mother observe the variations in the color of their friends' skin, viewed in terms of foods and things found in nature.

Kissinger- All the Colors We Are: Provides straightforward information for children, teachers, and parents that answers the often asked and hard-to-answer questions about how we get our skin color.

Konigsburg: Throwing Shadows: Five short stories in which young people gain a sense of self.

Lester- Let’s Talk about Race: The author introduces the concept of race as only one component in an individual's or nation's "story."

Look- Ruby Lu, Brave and True: "Almost-eight-year-old" Ruby Lu spends time with her baby brother, goes to Chinese school, performs magic tricks and learns to drive, and has adventures with both old and new friends.

Mitszu- Thanksgiving at Obaachan’s: A Japanese American girl describes Thanksgiving at her grandmother's house.

Rotner- Shades of People: Explores the many different shades of human skin, and points out that skin is just a covering that does not reveal what someone is like inside.

Ryan- Becoming Naomi Leon: When Naomi's absent mother resurfaces to claim her,  Naomi runs away to Mexico with her great-grandmother and younger brother in search of her father.

Schreck- Lucy’s Family Tree: Lucy, an adopted child from Mexico, is convinced that her family background is too complicated for her to make the family tree she is supposed to create for a homework assignment.

Books Dealing with Identity, Self Esteem, and Gender Roles

Howard- Virgie Goes to School with Us Boys: In the post-Civil War South, a young African American girl is determined to prove that she can go to school just like her older brothers.

Bridges- Ruby’s Wish: In China, at a time when few girls are taught to read or write, Ruby dreams of going to the university with her brothers and male cousins.

Choi- The Name Jar: After Unhei moves from Korea to the United States, her new classmates help her decide what her name should be.

De Paola- Now One Foot, Now the Other: When his grandfather suffers a stroke, Bobby teaches him to walk, just as his grandfather had once taught him.

De Paola- Oliver Button Is a Sissy: His classmates' taunts don't stop Oliver Button from doing what he likes best.

Fierstein- The Sissy Duckling: Elmer the duck is teased because he is different, but he proves himself by not only surviving the winter, but also saving his Papa.

Funke- The Princess Knight: Violetta, a little princess, is determined to become as big and strong as her brothers. She secretly teaches herself to become the bravest and cleverest knight in the land until she must face the king's best knights in a jousting tournament.

Geeslin- Elena’s Serenade: In Mexico, a little girl disguised as a boy, sets out for Monterrey determined to master the art of glassblowing, and in the process, experiences self-discovery along the way.

Gibbons- Mama and Me and the Model-T: When Mama gets behind the wheel of the new Model-T which her husband just drove into the yard of their Georgia mountain home, she proves that she can drive a car as well as the men of the family.

Howard- When I was Five: A six-year-old boy describes the things he liked when he was five and compares them to the things he likes now.

Kroll- Girl, You’re Amazing: Rhyming text celebrates the many remarkable things that girls can achieve, from packing a lunch box and lacing their shoes to swishing a basketball and climbing a tree.

Martin- The Storytelling Princess: Having survived a shipwreck, a princess tries to tell a prince a story whose ending he does not know and thus qualify for his hand in marriage.

Munsch- Stephanie’s Ponytail: Stephanie likes to have her own look. So when her classmates begin copying her ponytail, she finds increasingly outrageous ways to wear her hair until she outsmarts the copycats.

Otoshi- One: A number/color book reminding us that it just takes one to make everyone count.

Pinkwater- The Big Orange Splot: When a seagull drops a can of orange paint on his neat house, Mr. Plumbean gets an idea that affects his entire neighborhood.

Ryan- Riding Freedom: A fictionalized account of Charley (Charlotte) Parkhurst who ran away from an orphanage, posed as a boy, moved to California, and fooled everyone by her appearance.

Williams- Petronella: Determined not to be outdone by her brothers in seeking a fortune in the world, a young princess sets out to find a prince to rescue

12/2009